The COHP Difference

haitian education system

36% drop out of school before reaching 6th grade: Mostly due to lack of nutrition, funding and /or needing child to work.

 

National average of 70 students per class.

 

Lack of professional teachers, lack of training, insufficient structure, lack of nutrition and funds in the educational system are among the key drivers of the education crisis.

 
 
 
 
 

COHP

 3.37% drop out rate due to demographic challenges: camp displacement, family death, migration to rural zones.

 

16.5 students per class as well as 1 on 1 mentoring when needed.

 

Accredited teachers, constant training of teachers, strict school rules and methodology, meal plan, free education. Modern school environment with amenities.

Students per Teacher

 
 

Haiti Education Statistics

 
 

More Related Articles

 
 

With Haitian Schools in Ruins, Children in Limbo

By Simon Romero 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Thousands of schools in and around this devastated capital could remain closed for months or never reopen, according to Haitian and United Nations education officials. That leaves vast numbers of children languishing in camps or working in menial jobs as they struggle to survive.

 

Destruction of schools in Haiti quake crushes hopes of a better future for many

By William Booth and Scott Wilson

PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI -- Of the many things taken from this city by the earthquake, few are as threatening to Haiti's future as the near destruction of a school system viewed across society here as the only path to a better life.

 

Haitian education system 'totally collapsed'

By Andrew Cawthorne

PORT-AU-PRINCE - Half of Haiti's schools and its three main universities were destroyed or badly damaged in the earthquake, but classes must resume even in tents to help children overcome trauma, the education minister said.

 

In ruined Haiti schools, educators see opportunity

By Jonathan M. Katz

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - After seven weeks with seven children huddled under a shelter of tarps and sheets on the median strip of a busy road, Lissithe Delomme says the Haitian government can't reopen schools fast enough.